Africa's Population Potential

The UN projects that the African population will grow to 4.4 billion individuals by the end of this century, over a third of the entire global population. Despite its ethnically diverse peoples, Africa will not only become the world’s largest consumer market, but potentially also the biggest supply of cheap labor to the developed world.

An overlooked question, however, is whether African peoples will submit to such a secondary role willingly, or perhaps choose to conquer the world on foot instead. 

Development Aid

Western capitalists have long understood that, after having saturated their home markets, the only way to further increase demand was to breed new consumers. They have done so first and foremost by irresponsibly turning the African continent into a human factory, producing the surplus births needed to grow Western economies. 

As a consequence, since the second half of the twentieth century, Africans have suffered an involuntary population boom, brought about by money-hungry Western agriculturalists and capitalists that forced their surplus production onto Africa, under the manipulative guise of “development aid”. Posing as humanitarians, Westerners deliberately created Third World hunger as an excuse to westernize the region. 

Like China briefly had become a playground for the madness of Western architects, Africa has now become a breeding ground for Western consumerism. Modern-day capitalists thus succeeded in doing what European colonials could not: the submission of all of Africa. 

Avenging the Past

Once Africans realize what has been done to them, they will already vastly outnumber the populations of the West four-to-one; Europe nearly ten-to-one. Much like the angered Germanic tribes that had once gathered at the gates of Rome, Africa’s rising numbers will give them an incentive to try to conquer its former masters. Future historians will tell us whether they succeeded.

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Africa's Population Potential by Mathijs Koenraadt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.